young people – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 14:24:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://the-education-store.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png young people – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ 32 32 What’s wrong with the saffronization of the education system, says Vice President Naidu | Latest India News https://the-education-store.com/whats-wrong-with-the-saffronization-of-the-education-system-says-vice-president-naidu-latest-india-news/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 23:19:17 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/whats-wrong-with-the-saffronization-of-the-education-system-says-vice-president-naidu-latest-india-news/ Vice President Venkaiah Naidu on Saturday hit back at allegations that the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government is saffronizing the country’s education system and asked “what’s wrong with saffron?” he called on Indians to abandon their “colonial mindset”. Claiming that the ‘bhartiyakaran’ (Indianisation) of the education system has been the goal of the new national […]]]>

Vice President Venkaiah Naidu on Saturday hit back at allegations that the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government is saffronizing the country’s education system and asked “what’s wrong with saffron?” he called on Indians to abandon their “colonial mindset”.

Claiming that the ‘bhartiyakaran’ (Indianisation) of the education system has been the goal of the new national education policy, Naidu said: ‘But as you say it, some loving and living English people say we want go back. Yes, we want to go back to our roots, to know the greatness of our culture and our heritage, to understand the vast amount of treasures in our Vedas, our books, our scriptures… they don’t want us to know our greatness; they want us to suffer from an inferiority complex…they say we saffron…what’s wrong with saffron? I don’t understand it.

He made the statement after the inauguration of the South Asian Institute of Peace and Reconciliation at Dev Sanskriti Vishwa Vidyalaya in Haridwar in Uttarakhand.

“Prolonged colonial rule deprived large sections, including women, of education and only a small elite class had access to formal education. It is necessary to provide quality education to all, only then can our education be inclusive and democratic,” he added.

He further encouraged young people to propagate their mother tongue. “I would like to see a day in my life when the Indians will speak to their countrymen in their native tongue, when the administration will be conducted in the native tongue and when all orders of government will be issued in the language of the people”, a- he declared. Foreign dignitaries coming to India speak in their native language instead of English although they know it because they are proud of their language, he said.

Suryakant Dhasmana, vice president of the state congress, said the vice president should not have made a statement like “what’s wrong with saffron” as he holds a constitutional post. “As vice president, he should not speak like a BJP leader. Such statements are not expected in the speech of the vice president of the country.

Speaking about the rising tensions in the conflict-torn world, Naidu said that peace is a prerequisite for the progress of mankind. “Peace has a cascading effect: it generates social harmony and paves the way for progress and prosperity. The ‘peace dividend’ benefits all stakeholders and brings wealth and happiness to society,” he said.


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CNF, the host department of the Concussion Symposium https://the-education-store.com/cnf-the-host-department-of-the-concussion-symposium/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 19:18:48 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/cnf-the-host-department-of-the-concussion-symposium/ DR MYRON ROLLE, on the left, and Mario Bowleg, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture. By RENALDO DORSETT Tribune sports journalist rdorsett@tribunemedia.net In an effort to raise awareness of concussion education, Dr. Myron Rolle and the Caribbean Neurosurgery Foundation (CNF) organized a concussion symposium in conjunction with the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture ( […]]]>

DR MYRON ROLLE, on the left, and Mario Bowleg, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture.

By RENALDO DORSETT

Tribune sports journalist

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

In an effort to raise awareness of concussion education, Dr. Myron Rolle and the Caribbean Neurosurgery Foundation (CNF) organized a concussion symposium in conjunction with the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture ( MYSC).

Under the theme ‘The Awakening Power of Sport’, Rolle and panelists yesterday discussed some of the industry’s most important issues at Thomas A Robinson Stadium.

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Topics presented included an overview of the history of sports concussions, assessment mechanisms and tools, long-term effects, risks and mitigations, cultural stigma and self-reporting, recovery treatment and return to play, and finally, the future of concussion safety and protocols in The Bahamas.

Rolle and his panel spoke to the group of local sports leaders about the cultural change and holistic approach that must be taken for concussion education in the Bahamas to progress.

“When it comes to culture, it starts with raising awareness, advocacy, it starts with people who have capital and influence, it starts with leadership, implementing it early with our young people in elementary school so they grow up with the understanding that a torn ACL is less serious, but should be carried with the same level of value and importance as a concussion or brain injury .

“You can recover from your limp, you can be a phenomenal educator, law enforcement officer, doctor, businessman or whatever you want to be, but if your brain is affected at an age early on, you have limited options to progress towards the goals, dreams and ambitions you have set for yourself,” Rolle said.

“It will take a holistic approach, it’s multidimensional, it has to come from everywhere. There needs to be collective buy-in and until that happens we can still have the outdated approach that we still often see when it comes to concussions, brain injuries and how we think about it so vaguely that “it’s not real, toughen up, get back on the pitch, get back on the pitch, get back on the pitch”, those days are over. We can’t operate like this anymore and I can’t wait to help in this fight.

The CNF and MYSC have established recovery and return to play protocols for athletes who have suffered a traumatic brain injury. Throughout both protocols, healthcare professionals will monitor the development of signs and symptoms.

The organizations have also established a National Concussion Committee to oversee, govern, and pay particular attention to concussions and traumatic brain injuries that occur in the country.

The group will include the divisions of management, health and science, research and operations.

“We need to have an in-depth conversation about some of the particular nuances and details that go into our Bahamian athletes. We have to understand that if someone walks out or walks away from the recovery protocol or other things that we’re trying to put in place, they can’t do it with impunity and that needs to be addressed,” Rolle said. “We have to take it as seriously as someone who uses performance-enhancing drugs, or someone who bets on sports, or just does something nefarious outside the rules of what we expect our athletes to do. , coaches and federations.”

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Other panel members included Dr. Magnus Ekede, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at Princess Margaret Hospital and CNF Fellow; Niyi Odewade, cardiothoracic medicine student; Florida State Seminoles head coach Mike Norvel and New England Patriots athletic trainer Jim Whalden.

Rolle’s accolade-filled resume first went public as an All-American football player at Florida State University. He went on to become a member of the CoSIDA All-Academic Hall of Fame, a member of President Clinton’s Global Initiative team, one of three Bahamas Rhodes Scholars, and a Paul Farmer Global Surgery Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School. Through his foundation, Rolle previously established his “Play-4-Progress” program in the Bahamas and aimed to introduce three core principles to its participants: American football fundamentals, education and personal development. Rolle played three seasons with the Seminoles and was selected by the Tennessee Titans in the 2010 NFL Draft.

In 2012, he signed with the Pittsburgh Steelers and announced his retirement from the NFL in 2013. He then graduated from FSU College of Medicine in 2017 and was paired with a neurosurgery residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and at Harvard Medical School.

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LA Councilwoman seeks system to help Angelenos navigate student loans https://the-education-store.com/la-councilwoman-seeks-system-to-help-angelenos-navigate-student-loans/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 23:41:21 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/la-councilwoman-seeks-system-to-help-angelenos-navigate-student-loans/ With mandatory student loan repayments set to resume in May for millions of Americans, Los Angeles City Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez introduced two motions on Friday aimed at helping young Angelenos become better financially literate and manage their student loan debt. In his motions, Rodriguez noted that more than half of bachelor’s degree holders took out […]]]>

With mandatory student loan repayments set to resume in May for millions of Americans, Los Angeles City Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez introduced two motions on Friday aimed at helping young Angelenos become better financially literate and manage their student loan debt.

In his motions, Rodriguez noted that more than half of bachelor’s degree holders took out student loans and graduated with an average federal and private debt of $28,400. In the United States, a collective student debt of $1.75 trillion is owed, distributed among 46 million people.

“This system is often predatory and has a disproportionate impact on students of color who are most likely to use federal loans — burdening them with debt that impacts future financial gains,” Rodriguez said in the cover story. motions.

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Covid-19 Omicron outbreak: 14,941 new cases in the community today and one more death https://the-education-store.com/covid-19-omicron-outbreak-14941-new-cases-in-the-community-today-and-one-more-death/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/covid-19-omicron-outbreak-14941-new-cases-in-the-community-today-and-one-more-death/ Watch Live: Day 20 of the Wellington Covid-19 convoy protest. Video / NZ Herald Nearly 15,000 new community cases of Covid-19 and one further death were reported today. A patient died yesterday in a hospital in Northland. The person died of an unrelated medical condition and had tested positive for Covid-19, the health ministry said. […]]]>

Watch Live: Day 20 of the Wellington Covid-19 convoy protest. Video / NZ Herald

Nearly 15,000 new community cases of Covid-19 and one further death were reported today.

A patient died yesterday in a hospital in Northland. The person died of an unrelated medical condition and had tested positive for Covid-19, the health ministry said.

The tally of 14,941 community cases, including more than 9,000 in Auckland, shatters New Zealand’s previous record number of cases for the sixth consecutive day.

There are now 305 people in hospital, 42 more than yesterday. The number in intensive care remains at five.

“During the last fortnight, 59% [of cases] are under 30 and 12% are over 50,” the health ministry said.

“The two age groups with the highest percentage of cases are those aged 10-19 and those aged 20-29 which make up 25% and 25%
hundred cases respectively.

However, the opposite trend has been seen among those hospitalized with the virus, most over the age of 50, officials said.

“This reflects similar trends seen overseas where young people, who are more socially active, often have higher infection rates, although it is the older age groups who are most likely to require a hospital treatment due to Covid-19.”

The three DHBs in the Auckland region “continue to predominate with the highest infection rates in the country”.

But DHBs from the south, Waikato and the Bay of Plenty also have high rates.

The locations of the new cases are: Northland (225), Auckland (9046), Waikato (1519), Bay of Plenty (812), Lakes (208), Hawke’s Bay (136), MidCentral (142), Whanganui (19), Taranaki (100), Tairāwhiti (69), Wairarapa (45), Capital and Coast (516), Hutt Valley (373), Nelson Marlborough (158), Canterbury (981), South Canterbury (44), Southern (532), West Coast (9); Unknown (5).

Of the 305 patients hospitalized with the virus, two are in Northland Hospital, 45 are in North Shore, 110 are in Middlemore, 100 are in Auckland, five are in Tauranga, three are in Taranaki, 34 are in Waikato and three each are in Canterbury and South.

The average age of people currently hospitalized is 52 years old.

Of the nearly 15,000 new cases detected since yesterday, 5,747 were detected via PCR tests. The other 9,194 were reported via rapid antigen test (RAT) tests.

There were 41 new cases detected at the border.

Over the past week, the number of newly detected community cases of Covid-19 each day has increased more than fivefold – from just over 2,500 cases reported last Sunday to 13,606 yesterday.

The huge spike in cases has named New Zealand one of the most contagious places in the world right now, according to a new analysis.

Since last Sunday, hospitalizations have also increased but not nearly at the same rate. There were 100 Covid-19 patients in hospital a week ago and 263 yesterday.

That’s about as expected, according to a 25-page update on the latest studies on Omicron variants released by the Department of Health in recent days. Omicron remains more transmissible than the previously dominant Delta variant, but continues to have a lower risk of hospitalization and death, the report says.

However, vaccination status and comorbidities still play an important role in determining overall risk, the report notes.

“A pre-printed Swedish study comparing the Omicron period to Delta found that the risk of severe disease was lower with Omicron by 40% for unvaccinated people and 71% for vaccinated people,” the report said.

Police and protesters clash in Parliament on Saturday, which marked the 19th day of the anti-mandate occupation.  Photo/George Heard
Police and protesters clash in Parliament on Saturday, which marked the 19th day of the anti-mandate occupation. Photo/George Heard

“Furthermore, the risk of severe Covid-19 remained high among unvaccinated and first-infected cases of both sexes during the Omicron period in the 65+ age group, as well as among men in the age group 40-64 with two or more comorbidities.”

A US study, meanwhile, found that while the risk of hospitalization is lower per individual, hospitalizations have increased overall due to the sharp increase in the number of people infected.

There were eight Covid-related deaths in New Zealand in the week from last Sunday to yesterday – with five deaths reported on Friday alone.

New Zealand’s Covid Adverse Distinction

New Zealand’s infection rate is currently the highest in the world, according to

an analysis published this morning

by Rako Science, which offers saliva PCR tests.

However, the unwanted distinction is not particularly surprising as New Zealand’s surge comes after the outbreak of Omicron has already peaked in many other countries.

New Zealand’s Reff – also known as its “effective reproduction number” or “R-value” – was 3.74 this morning, Rako Science noted. This means that on average each person with Covid-19 would spread it to 3.74 other people.

In countries where the epidemic has peaked and cases are declining, the Reff is less than one.

For example, New South Wales and Victoria in Australia both peaked early in the year with Reffs at around 3.5. Both states, however, have since fallen below one. Meanwhile, in Western Australia, which experiences a similar Omicron timeline to New Zealand, the R-value is currently 3.07.

Spread of protest

Today’s Covid figures come as anti-mandate protests continue – and as health officials warn they are potentially becoming superspreader events.

Protesters who were in Wellington were starting to show up at hospitals across the country with Covid-19 after returning home, health and police officials said yesterday.

“We are advising anyone currently attending the protest, or who participated in it, who has cold and flu symptoms, to get tested and self-isolate until they receive their result,” said the Ministry of Health.

Yesterday, which marked the 19th day of the deadlock in the capital, protests also broke out in Auckland, Tauranga and Christchurch.

Auckland protesters camped out on the estate last night with no visible police presence.  Photo / Provided
Auckland protesters camped out on the estate last night with no visible police presence. Photo / Provided

Police in riot gear arrived outside Parliament last night after a day marked by sometimes rowdy scenes – including an arrest and several officers saying they had been spat on.

However, police estimated around 200 new arrivals to the occupation on Saturday – fewer than expected.

At the Auckland Domain, there was no visible police presence this morning after protesters camped out overnight. About a dozen tents had been erected.

The school closes

Rising cases over the past week have prompted a school in West Auckland to

temporarily close its doors

starts tomorrow.

Henderson Intermediate principal Wendy Esera and council chair have issued the call for everyone to switch to online learning for the next two weeks after realizing that as of Thursday 169 students had already had to isolate because they were someone’s family contact. with the virus.

On Friday, there was a case in almost every classroom and several staff members were also sick. One class had four confirmed cases.

Children of essential workers will remain the exception to the new rule. They will still be allowed on campus.

About one in five schools nationwide had at least one Covid case among students or staff on Thursday. This is equivalent to 549 schools or kura.

Of these, 326 were in Auckland, according to the Department for Education.

covid
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Local authorities will be empowered to deal with waste management issues https://the-education-store.com/local-authorities-will-be-empowered-to-deal-with-waste-management-issues/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 12:03:30 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/local-authorities-will-be-empowered-to-deal-with-waste-management-issues/ Christopher (left) and Chin (right) presented a souvenir to Galharague as a thank you for the French Embassy’s donation to Blu Hope’s Sabah Plastic Neutral campaign. KOTA KINABALU (February 17): The Solid Waste Management and Public Sanitation Law is in the works to empower local authorities to enforce, collect and dispose of solid waste, as […]]]>

Christopher (left) and Chin (right) presented a souvenir to Galharague as a thank you for the French Embassy’s donation to Blu Hope’s Sabah Plastic Neutral campaign.

KOTA KINABALU (February 17): The Solid Waste Management and Public Sanitation Law is in the works to empower local authorities to enforce, collect and dispose of solid waste, as well as address issues state waste management system, said Local Government and Housing Minister Datuk. Seri Panglima Masidi Manjun.

He said Sabah’s natural heritage is under threat due to our unsustainable way of life, including our use of plastic and the resulting plastic pollution.

Currently, he said less than 10% of the plastic produced is recycled.

Instead, he said 90% was disposed of in landfills or incinerated – emitting greenhouse gases.

“More than eight million tonnes of discarded plastic enter our oceans each year and the plastic is now found in the deepest place on Earth – in the Mariana Trench, nearly 11 kilometers below sea level. .”

Globally this year alone, Masidi said researchers have estimated that plastic production and incineration will pump more than 850 million tonnes of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

If it continues unchecked, plastic production is expected to triple by 2050. The corresponding emissions would reach 2.8 billion tonnes, he said at the Plastic Neutral Education and Awareness Launch Dinner from Sabah on Wednesday evening.

His speech was delivered by Deputy Minister of Local Government and Housing, Hj Mohamad Hamsan Hj Awang Supain.

In Malaysia, Masidi said the main source of ocean plastic is land-based – plastic escaping from landfills and litter accounts for 80% of plastic pollution entering the ocean.

“Waste dumped in the streets, sewers and rivers ends up in the ocean.

“Plastic waste in the ocean is either broken down into microplastics that can be eaten by fish and shellfish, thus also entering the human food chain.

“A lot of plastic is coming back with the tide, littering Sabah’s beautiful sandy beaches with debris and plastic waste.

“Sabahans living near the sea have to live with generations of plastic waste.”

He added that Malaysia alone was ranked in a recent study as the fifth biggest ocean plastic polluter in the world.

In an “Ocean Conservancy” report, it said neighboring countries of Indonesia, the Philippines, China, Thailand and Vietnam were listed as accounting for 60% of the annual ocean plastic input.

“From the amount of plastic waste entering our oceans, it is clear that our waste management systems are not coping and sadly Malaysia has been ranked eighth in the world for mismanaged plastic waste.”

Therefore, Masidi said the state government is pleased with Blu Hope’s progress under the Sabah Plastic Neutral initiative.

“Blu Hope’s goals of maximizing the value of plastic waste – specifically bringing real, tangible and shared value to all Sabahans through organizations, through education and awareness, collection and separation of plastic at the source, different recycling technologies and scientific beach cleaning, creating a circular plastic economy comes at such an important time to help support communities in Sabah in particular and protect our unique biodiversity.

With the enactment of solid waste management and public sanitation underway, he said Sabah would be able to empower local authorities in the enforcement, collection and disposal of solid waste and would provide a solution to the state’s waste management problems.

“With strong additional support from international governments, Sabah can and will lead the way with Sabah Plastic Neutral for a healthier and more sustainable future as UNESCO’s Decade of Oceans begins.”

Meanwhile, Sabah’s Director of Education, Datuk Dr Mistirine Radin, said, “Water is life! – Rethinking the Plastics Education and Awareness Program” would encourage behavioral change towards the use of plastics, starting with young people.

In just three sessions, she said all students in Sabah would learn about the ocean, the problem of plastic waste and the different solutions.

“Through interactive sessions with the whole family, they reflect on their use of plastic, creating the change needed.”

Meanwhile, Dr Mistirine said the program is providing reliable, safe and clean drinking water to all students and teachers in Sabah by installing a unique water filter in all schools in the state, thus solving the biggest problem of single-use plastic waste in schools, especially plastic. Bottles of water.

She said Sabah Education Department will give full support to Blu Hope and its Water is Life! – Redesign the plastics education and awareness program to reach all students and teachers by the end of 2023.

Also in attendance were French Ambassador to Malaysia, Roland Galharague, Blu Hope Founder, Simon Christopher, and Blu Hope Co-Founder and Community Director, Monica Chin.






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A colossal undertaking: fixing the Nigerian education system https://the-education-store.com/a-colossal-undertaking-fixing-the-nigerian-education-system/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 16:36:47 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/a-colossal-undertaking-fixing-the-nigerian-education-system/ We know that the educational system of each country has problems. By its very nature, public education will be of poor quality, even if it is well funded. We know this inherently when it comes to other products or services: every time you try to mass-produce something, the quality suffers. Individual tutoring and instruction yields […]]]>

We know that the educational system of each country has problems. By its very nature, public education will be of poor quality, even if it is well funded.

We know this inherently when it comes to other products or services: every time you try to mass-produce something, the quality suffers.

Individual tutoring and instruction yields by far the best results. But a country needs to reach millions of people and therefore cannot afford this luxury.

Nigeria is very far away and your own country probably knows its problems. Why should you care about the school system in that distant place, when your country probably has similar problems?

The main reason to care is that Nigeria’s obstacles are not unique. All the problems: underfunding, political conflicts and internal cultural clashes are universal. Most countries have them, and sadly, Nigeria has only eleven.

Even if you are not a humanitarian, sheer necessity would force you to be careful. There is a lot to learn from this situation because you never know when you will encounter similar problems.

Let’s take a look at the main factors that contribute to this massive crisis:

Lack of funding and infrastructure

There is serious mismanagement of resources and poor infrastructure that present barriers for young people trying to get an education.

The North simply does not have enough schools for the number of children who should be educated there. Many have to walk great distances every day just to get to the nearest school.

The South lacks conditions conducive to learning. For example, some schools do not have functional toilets or the number of teachers is too low.

Western children are used to teaching materials, televisions and computers, while their peers in southern Nigeria lack them.

Overall, there are almost not enough resources for everyone. The North is particularly affected, but the South has similar problems.

It’s no secret that during our early years, our families are our support structure. But what if our families can’t support us? Well, we lose our edge in life.

The northern half of the country has the lion’s share of out-of-school children. It is the poorer of the two regions, and it shows.

Many families live on the edge of survival, prioritizing food and water. They just can’t afford to invest money in uniforms, textbooks and any other related expenses especially since the families are rather large so they have to worry about sending more of a child at school.

When asked about the state of the education system, Nigerian officials tend to turn to issues such as insurgencies, nomadic living, theft and bandit-type activities, and religious extremism (Boko Haram).

All of these factors surely contribute to the problem. If an insurgent army thinks “education is bad” and walks around promoting its ideals, interest in education will diminish.

Moreover, if a child is part of a nomadic community, it will be impossible for him to attend the same school and receive an education. Nomads in general tend not to succeed in our modern societies based on massive centralized governments and sedentary life.

Depending on who you ask, this is by far the biggest problem. The government is not allocating enough resources to education, despite international warnings and advice.

Also, the money that is eventually donated can be stolen along the way. Grant and scholarship money is a common target for “misplacement”.

The education system is an investment in the future and offers few opportunities for politicians to get rich in the short term. There are almost no contracts and bribes, so schools will be ignored.

Currently, only 6% of the total budget is allocated. This is a tiny percentage, compared to the 26% recommended by Unesco.

It is very important to realize that, as stated earlier, the problems of Nigeria are the problems of the world. Your country may be doing well right now, but no one is on top forever. Human history will always know periods of abundance and periods of conflict, war and poverty.

If we build our school systems to be fragile and expensive, then we accept that education is only a luxury, not a basic right. A good education system must be disaster-proof and able to function with minimal resources.

The only reason this particular country stands out is because of the extent to which the problems manifest.

We need to make sure we are discussing solutions (plural). There is no single action or single problem that can solve such a massive undertaking.

Before the invention of gunpowder weapons, only nobles were good fighters. Armor, weapons, horses, banners, jousting and other necessities were simply beyond the reach of ordinary people.

Then the gun arrived. With just two weeks of training, an average Joe could learn to shoot and defeat a knight. The gun was an equalizer.

Internet too. If you work and come home exhausted, often neglecting household chores because of that exhaustion, when will you ever have time to educate yourself?

Classes are held at strict times, by certain people, in certain buildings (Universities), for which a request must be made. In contrast, the Internet allows you to buy courses for a hundredth of the price and browse them whenever you have free time.

Is it easy? No. Online education has proven to be worse than in-person classes. But is it possible?

The answer is yes. It is much more difficult to learn from a laptop than from a teacher, but it is not impossible. Ten thousand human lives would not be enough to sift through all the information available online.

Smart devices are getting very cheap and the internet seems to be the only short-term solution.

As a citizen of Nigeria or any other country, you live in a system that you did not create. For better or for worse, you were born there.

You, the student, cannot control who is responsible, how much money is spent on your education, or what war is going on. Moreover, even if a solution is found, by the time it is implemented, it will be too late for you personally.

As mentioned, the internet can be a great equalizer. It’s cheap and hard to learn online, but it can be done. Meanwhile, on a large scale, political action must be taken to get rid of corruption.

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The child care system is broken; Congress must act https://the-education-store.com/the-child-care-system-is-broken-congress-must-act/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 09:06:25 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/the-child-care-system-is-broken-congress-must-act/ As a mother of three young children and a proud provider of child care, I cry out loud for the attention of Congress: the child care crisis in our country has reached a catastrophic level. The pandemic has exposed longstanding issues facing the child care industry – for families, providers and children. Our elected leaders […]]]>

As a mother of three young children and a proud provider of child care, I cry out loud for the attention of Congress: the child care crisis in our country has reached a catastrophic level.

The pandemic has exposed longstanding issues facing the child care industry – for families, providers and children. Our elected leaders must understand the realities faced by providers like me and families like mine and bring about the change that is needed now.

Over the years, I’ve worked at a local early learning center, for Michigan’s Great Start Readiness Preschools, and even spent five years running a home-based child care program. I love my job and know its value to our children, but I am regularly overworked and underpaid. At the same time, I know the pain and frustration that parents in Michigan face as they try to find affordable, high-quality child care close to home.

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Details and theories are released as authorities announce arrest in McKinley High School violence https://the-education-store.com/details-and-theories-are-released-as-authorities-announce-arrest-in-mckinley-high-school-violence/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/details-and-theories-are-released-as-authorities-announce-arrest-in-mckinley-high-school-violence/ Police and prosecutors have confirmed the arrest and arraignment Thursday night of a 17-year-old, in connection with a violent fight outside McKinley High School on Wednesday afternoon that stabbed a 14-year-old student and shot a security guard. The suspect, whose name has not been released, is charged as a minor with attempted second degree murder […]]]>

Police and prosecutors have confirmed the arrest and arraignment Thursday night of a 17-year-old, in connection with a violent fight outside McKinley High School on Wednesday afternoon that stabbed a 14-year-old student and shot a security guard.

The suspect, whose name has not been released, is charged as a minor with attempted second degree murder and first degree assault. The male suspect, who is also believed to be a McKinley student, was being held in a juvenile detention center ahead of a bond hearing scheduled for Monday morning before Youth Court Judge Kelly Brinkworth.

The attacker is accused of being part of a group that fought outside the school after classes had ended for the day. He was arrested Thursday evening and indicted shortly before midnight.

“We have video of the incident. We have statements. We have witnesses. Investigators have done a very good job of getting to the point, while working with the district attorney’s office, to get to the point where we could lay those charges,” Buffalo Police Assistant Commissioner Joseph Gramaglia said during a Friday morning briefing. “We were on somebody pretty quickly. It just took a little while to gather enough evidence to make this arrest.

At first it was believed that two people, a student and a security guard stepping in to break up the fight, had been shot dead. It was determined when the juvenile victim was taken to surgery that she was not shot, but rather stabbed. The teenager, according to Mayor Byron Brown, was in stable condition Friday morning.

The security guard, who was shot in the leg, was treated and released that day.

Police said Friday morning that further investigation led them to discover that a second student, aged 13, had been grazed in the arm by gunfire during the violence. The shooter was still at large Friday morning.

“First and foremost, we are still investigating whether or not other people were involved in the assault on the victim. In addition to this, we also believe there was a separate individual who had a weapon and fired the shots that hit the security guard in the leg, and also allegedly struck another student, grazing him in the arm,” said Erie County District Attorney John Flynn.

Crimestoppers is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to an arrest or indictment.

Brown, during his remarks inside Buffalo Police Headquarters, offered some theories about an increase in violence.

“First, I think the pandemic is impacting some of the increase in violence that we’re seeing not just here in this community, but we’re seeing across the country. People are angry. People are frustrated. People are scared. And in particular, I think our young people have been affected,” Brown said. “Furthermore, it is clear that there are simply too many illegal guns on the streets in communities across the country, urban, suburban and rural.”

Flynn further suggests that the state’s criminal justice reforms have backfired. He specifically points to the state’s “Raise the Age” reform, which raised the legal age of criminal responsibility to 18. The reform, enacted in April 2017, aimed to ensure that non-violent young offenders receive evidence-based intervention and treatment.

While acknowledging the roles that poverty and dysfunctional home environments can play in influencing a young offender’s behavior, Flynn said Friday that what has happened since these reforms were introduced is a loss of accountability.

“Over the past two or three years, we have not only seen a significant increase in the number of minors charged with crimes, but also a significant increase in the number of minors who are victims of crimes,” Flynn said. “What we need to start doing is start focusing our attention on the victims of crimes and not necessarily the defendants. And we need to start holding the accused accountable for their actions. »

The DA went on to say that it deals with a young offender who, for example, might be caught with a bag or marijuana or who breaks into a car to sleep in because the teenager is homeless. In these cases, he insists, he wants to help them.

In cases involving violent crimes, however, he says it is necessary to implement “tough love”.

“We have to have some responsibility here. We have to have, using a school term and an education term, we have to have a little more discipline,” Flynn said. “And if my dear friends from Albany don’t want to be more disciplined, well, that’s why you made me prosecutor. I guess I will.

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Need to reintegrate children into the system: Abhijeet Banerjee https://the-education-store.com/need-to-reintegrate-children-into-the-system-abhijeet-banerjee/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 11:35:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/need-to-reintegrate-children-into-the-system-abhijeet-banerjee/ According to Nobel Laureate Abhijeet Banerjee, learning losses from school closures are one of the biggest global threats to long-term recovery from COVID-19 and the economic cost will be severe if remedial measures are not taken. are not taken urgently. Noting that temporary school closures will cause permanent damage, he said simply […]]]>

According to Nobel Laureate Abhijeet Banerjee, learning losses from school closures are one of the biggest global threats to long-term recovery from COVID-19 and the economic cost will be severe if remedial measures are not taken. are not taken urgently.

Noting that temporary school closures will cause permanent damage, he said simply reopening schools would not be enough and that failing to measure learning losses and take steps to reintegrate children into the system would be a “recipe for a disaster”.



The renowned economist is co-chair of the Global Education Evidence Advisory Group (GEEAP), which is working on recommendations for the education sector in the post-pandemic world. He won the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economics.

“The short- and long-term impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the education, well-being and future productivity of children is profound. Nearly two years after school closures began in most of countries around the world, governments must take urgent action to limit the Estimates suggest that the economic cost of lost learning from the crisis will run into the trillions of US dollars if corrective action is not taken urgently Banerjee told PTI in a phone interview from Massachusetts in the United States.

“While many other sectors rebounded as lockdowns eased, the damage to children’s education is likely to reduce children’s well-being and productivity for decades, causing disruption to education and learning losses due to school closures, one of the biggest threats to mid- to long-term recovery from COVID-19 unless governments act quickly,” he added.

Banerjee, who is currently a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), said schools should reopen at the earliest opportunity.

“Schools need to reopen and stay open as much as possible, but that will not be enough. It is very important to tackle the problem of dropouts to ensure that they return to school and have a plan to reintegrate children in the school system.

“Failing to measure learning loss and acting on the results will be an absolute recipe for disaster. We must recognize that children will definitely fall behind and urgent action must be taken to close the gap and minimize learning loss. income,” he said.

Launched in July 2020, GEEAP is an independent interdisciplinary body composed of leading education experts from around the world. Its mandate is to provide succinct, actionable, and policy-oriented recommendations to support decision-making by policy makers on investments in education in low- and middle-income countries.

“The third factor that countries urgently need to work on is teacher training. Teachers already had a difficult job and with learning losses, children falling behind and varying levels of learning in the classroom, it is harder for teachers to help most students catch up. Providing teachers with simple teaching guides combined with strong tracking and feedback systems can help them structure their teaching approach and ensure that children learn additional tutoring can also help children catch up,” Banerjee said.

“In addition to requiring urgent recovery efforts, the pandemic presents a rare opportunity to rethink and reset education provision so that children of all identities, socio-economic backgrounds and circumstances can learn and thrive,” he added.

Banerjee also warned against closing schools unless there is an aggressive variant of COVID-19 that puts children at extremely high risk.

“Even in the event of new outbreaks, schools should be the last institution to close and the first to reopen, given the relatively low risk of transmission and high cost to young people. If there is an aggressive variant of COVID-19 which puts children at extremely high risk, of course no one wants children to die. But if that’s not the case, I think we should avoid closing schools any further,” he said. .

Schools around the world closed in 2020 following the novel coronavirus outbreak and reopened in various countries depending on the Covid situation. At the height of the crisis, UNESCO data showed that more than 1.6 billion learners in more than 190 countries were out of school. More than 100 million teachers and school staff have been affected by the sudden closures of educational institutions.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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An additional £2m to support the recovery of the outdoor education sector in Scotland https://the-education-store.com/an-additional-2m-to-support-the-recovery-of-the-outdoor-education-sector-in-scotland/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/an-additional-2m-to-support-the-recovery-of-the-outdoor-education-sector-in-scotland/ The Badaguish Outdoor Center in Glenmore is a local center that provides outdoor education to school children. Outdoor education centers facing financial difficulties as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic can apply for a new £2m fund this month. Available to private sector and third sector centres, the support will help cover running costs and […]]]>

The Badaguish Outdoor Center in Glenmore is a local center that provides outdoor education to school children.

Outdoor education centers facing financial difficulties as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic can apply for a new £2m fund this month.

Available to private sector and third sector centres, the support will help cover running costs and enable staff to deliver more outdoor learning to schools.

The funding brings the Scottish Government’s support for the sector during the pandemic to £4.5 million.

Minister for Children and Young People, Clare Haughey, said: “For many organizations providing outdoor residential education, the pandemic has caused significant challenges and it has been a very difficult time for them.

“The experiences offered by these centers are vitally important to our children and youth.

“This extra £2million will help outdoor education centers get through what we hope will be the endgame of this pandemic.

“It will mean more opportunities for children and young people to have the engaging, rewarding and exciting outdoor educational experiences they deserve.”

Martin Davidson, of The Outward Bound Trust, said: ‘Outdoor centers warmly welcome the additional emergency funding from the Scottish Government.

“While technically outdoor residential experiences have been able to resume since August, the coronavirus continues to make it difficult to return to financial viability.

“The funding will help ensure that outdoor centers do not close and that the transformative experiences they provide remain available for future generations of young people.

The £2m funding comes on top of an initial £2m provided in early 2021 and a further £500,000 for a range of outdoor learning projects over the summer this year, bringing the Scottish Government’s total additional investment in outdoor learning to £4.5. million.


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