long term – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 14:22:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://the-education-store.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png long term – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ 32 32 CNF, the host department of the Concussion Symposium https://the-education-store.com/cnf-the-host-department-of-the-concussion-symposium/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 19:18:48 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/cnf-the-host-department-of-the-concussion-symposium/ DR MYRON ROLLE, on the left, and Mario Bowleg, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture. By RENALDO DORSETT Tribune sports journalist rdorsett@tribunemedia.net In an effort to raise awareness of concussion education, Dr. Myron Rolle and the Caribbean Neurosurgery Foundation (CNF) organized a concussion symposium in conjunction with the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture ( […]]]>

DR MYRON ROLLE, on the left, and Mario Bowleg, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture.

By RENALDO DORSETT

Tribune sports journalist

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

In an effort to raise awareness of concussion education, Dr. Myron Rolle and the Caribbean Neurosurgery Foundation (CNF) organized a concussion symposium in conjunction with the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture ( MYSC).

Under the theme ‘The Awakening Power of Sport’, Rolle and panelists yesterday discussed some of the industry’s most important issues at Thomas A Robinson Stadium.

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Topics presented included an overview of the history of sports concussions, assessment mechanisms and tools, long-term effects, risks and mitigations, cultural stigma and self-reporting, recovery treatment and return to play, and finally, the future of concussion safety and protocols in The Bahamas.

Rolle and his panel spoke to the group of local sports leaders about the cultural change and holistic approach that must be taken for concussion education in the Bahamas to progress.

“When it comes to culture, it starts with raising awareness, advocacy, it starts with people who have capital and influence, it starts with leadership, implementing it early with our young people in elementary school so they grow up with the understanding that a torn ACL is less serious, but should be carried with the same level of value and importance as a concussion or brain injury .

“You can recover from your limp, you can be a phenomenal educator, law enforcement officer, doctor, businessman or whatever you want to be, but if your brain is affected at an age early on, you have limited options to progress towards the goals, dreams and ambitions you have set for yourself,” Rolle said.

“It will take a holistic approach, it’s multidimensional, it has to come from everywhere. There needs to be collective buy-in and until that happens we can still have the outdated approach that we still often see when it comes to concussions, brain injuries and how we think about it so vaguely that “it’s not real, toughen up, get back on the pitch, get back on the pitch, get back on the pitch”, those days are over. We can’t operate like this anymore and I can’t wait to help in this fight.

The CNF and MYSC have established recovery and return to play protocols for athletes who have suffered a traumatic brain injury. Throughout both protocols, healthcare professionals will monitor the development of signs and symptoms.

The organizations have also established a National Concussion Committee to oversee, govern, and pay particular attention to concussions and traumatic brain injuries that occur in the country.

The group will include the divisions of management, health and science, research and operations.

“We need to have an in-depth conversation about some of the particular nuances and details that go into our Bahamian athletes. We have to understand that if someone walks out or walks away from the recovery protocol or other things that we’re trying to put in place, they can’t do it with impunity and that needs to be addressed,” Rolle said. “We have to take it as seriously as someone who uses performance-enhancing drugs, or someone who bets on sports, or just does something nefarious outside the rules of what we expect our athletes to do. , coaches and federations.”

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Other panel members included Dr. Magnus Ekede, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at Princess Margaret Hospital and CNF Fellow; Niyi Odewade, cardiothoracic medicine student; Florida State Seminoles head coach Mike Norvel and New England Patriots athletic trainer Jim Whalden.

Rolle’s accolade-filled resume first went public as an All-American football player at Florida State University. He went on to become a member of the CoSIDA All-Academic Hall of Fame, a member of President Clinton’s Global Initiative team, one of three Bahamas Rhodes Scholars, and a Paul Farmer Global Surgery Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School. Through his foundation, Rolle previously established his “Play-4-Progress” program in the Bahamas and aimed to introduce three core principles to its participants: American football fundamentals, education and personal development. Rolle played three seasons with the Seminoles and was selected by the Tennessee Titans in the 2010 NFL Draft.

In 2012, he signed with the Pittsburgh Steelers and announced his retirement from the NFL in 2013. He then graduated from FSU College of Medicine in 2017 and was paired with a neurosurgery residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and at Harvard Medical School.

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Bayelsa will improve the education sector with the results of the summit https://the-education-store.com/bayelsa-will-improve-the-education-sector-with-the-results-of-the-summit/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 15:30:38 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/bayelsa-will-improve-the-education-sector-with-the-results-of-the-summit/ The Bayelsa State Government has expressed its commitment to implementing the outcomes of the first education summit held recently in the state to achieve a viable education plan and policy in 15 years for the state. Education Commissioner Gentle Emelah told Yenagoa on Monday that the implementation will involve partnerships and collaborations to achieve the […]]]>

The Bayelsa State Government has expressed its commitment to implementing the outcomes of the first education summit held recently in the state to achieve a viable education plan and policy in 15 years for the state.

Education Commissioner Gentle Emelah told Yenagoa on Monday that the implementation will involve partnerships and collaborations to achieve the summit’s goals to address short, medium and long-term education challenges.

He was flanked by the ministry’s permanent secretary, Christopher Ehwrudjakpo; Education Summit Committee Co-Chair Alice Atuwo; secretary, Stella Ugolo and the commissioner’s technical adviser, Warmate Idikio.

Emelah said the summit, which was themed “Optimizing delivery, performance and sustainability of results in the education sector”, was a success.

He said, “The summit generally agreed that Bayelsa State has taken a very bold and just step to address its educational challenges to improve the delivery of education.

“It was stated that the outcomes of the summit should be adapted, conscientiously followed up and implemented to achieve the overall goals of providing a concise and actionable education plan and policy, including future partnerships and collaborations.”

According to him, the summit reiterated the need for a critical assessment of current educational structures, practices, goals and principles to align them with the government’s new aspirations for educational transformation.

He said the summit affirmed the relevance of the ten themes that were framed to examine the issues, problems, prospects and way forward in the education sector.

Emelah highlighted themes such as access to education; school administration; financing and financing of education; infrastructural situation, requirements and needs; quality assurance and quality control; study programme; creation and management of primary and secondary schools; establishment and management of higher institutions; teaching standards and stipulations; and issues relating to teacher salaries, incentives and motivation.

He further noted that the summit proposed the establishment of a committee of professionals, technocrats and stakeholders to carefully review all presentations, opinions and recommendations, and come up with an actionable report.

The Commissioner commended Governor Douye Diri for his support and commended former President Goodluck Jonathan for his outstanding keynote address, as well as other eminent scholars, partners and stakeholders for their contributions to the success of the summit.

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COVID-19 State Resource Guide Update: Leveraging Federal and State Authorities to Ensure Access to LTSS – Food, Drugs, Healthcare, Life Sciences https://the-education-store.com/covid-19-state-resource-guide-update-leveraging-federal-and-state-authorities-to-ensure-access-to-ltss-food-drugs-healthcare-life-sciences/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 06:23:18 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/covid-19-state-resource-guide-update-leveraging-federal-and-state-authorities-to-ensure-access-to-ltss-food-drugs-healthcare-life-sciences/ Manatt, Phelps & Phillips LLP United States: COVID-19 State Resource Guide Update: Leveraging Federal and State Authorities to Ensure Access to LTSS March 10, 2022 Manatt, Phelps & Phillips LLP To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to […]]]>




United States: COVID-19 State Resource Guide Update: Leveraging Federal and State Authorities to Ensure Access to LTSS

To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com.

Editor’s Note: Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, federal and state policymakers have acted to preserve access to services for populations using Medicaid-covered long-term services and supports (LTSS). These populations include older adults and people with chronic conditions or disabilities who are at high risk of severe cases if they contract COVID-19 and face disruptions in access to care if they or their caregivers must quarantine or self-isolate. Among other actions, policymakers directed emergency funding to strengthen providers and maintain Medicaid coverage for individuals, and provided regulatory relief to minimize administrative, clinical, or financial barriers to accessing services.

Manatt Health described these actions in “COVID-19 State Resource Guide: Leaving Federal and State Authority to Guarantee Access to Long-Term Services and Supports for High-Risk Individuals,” published in February 2021.1 Manatt has updated the resource guide based on an analysis of new or changed regulatory flexibilities and other state administrative measures through July 2021, as well as ongoing monitoring of overall state responses to pandemic to ensure access to LTSS for those at high risk. The main conclusions are summarized below. Click here to access a free copy of the full update.

Manatt Health found that as states operationalized their existing temporary Medicaid regulatory flexibilities, they gained a better understanding of long-standing vulnerabilities in their LTSS systems that worsened during the pandemic and focused on the long-term improvement of the system.

Key trends in 2021 include:

  • States have strategically leveraged federal funding to improve their responses to COVID-19 and invest in longer-term system reforms. All 50 states, plus the District of Columbia, submitted to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and began implementing Home and Community Services (HCBS) “spending plans” to leverage new federal funding authorized by the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 to meet their COVID-19 related HCBS needs and to strengthen and improve their HCBS systems.2

  • States, including California and Massachusetts, have taken a closer look at health disparities in their states that have been illuminated by the pandemicincluding the disproportionate impacts that COVID-19 and state vaccination efforts have had on residents and communities of color.3

  • States continued to administer and monitor their existing pandemic-related regulatory flexibilities, and a few states made some temporary flexibilities permanent. Most states focused on continuing to implement and monitor their existing flexibilities and did not request new pandemic-related regulatory flexibilities or change existing ones.

Planning for 2022

The temporary regulatory flexibilities enacted during the Public Health Emergency (PHE) provide a unique opportunity for states to innovate new policies and care delivery approaches with the goal of minimizing barriers to care and strengthening their LTSS systems. Although quantitative data from Medicaid on the impact of temporary regulatory flexibilities on consumer access and use of services, health disparity reduction and caregivers and direct care providers is sparse at this time. stage, states are learning from their pandemic experiences, and some states have begun to make temporary reforms permanent. In 2022, all states will continue to leverage U.S. bailout funds to make strategic investments in benefits, infrastructure, and LTSS programs to ensure seamless and safe access to essential services for high-risk members. of Medicaid.

Footnotes

1 This report was published as an update to the original report published by Manatt Health in 2020.

2 Strengthening and Investing in Home and Community Services for Medicaid Recipients: American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 Section 9817 Spending Plans and Narratives.

3 Unlocking Race and Ethnicity Data to Advance Health Equity in California: Proposals for State Action (April 2021); Racism and racial inequalities in health: An introduction based on data on health disparities in Massachusetts (December 2021).

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

POPULAR ARTICLES ON: US Food, Drugs, Healthcare, Life Sciences

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Hillsborough School System to Rebuild Career Centers https://the-education-store.com/hillsborough-school-system-to-rebuild-career-centers/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 22:26:39 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/hillsborough-school-system-to-rebuild-career-centers/ The Hillsborough County School District will overhaul its network of career centers, starting with the severely underutilized DW Waters and Bowers-Whitley schools. Waters, off Columbus Drive in West Tampa, is operating at 9% capacity with 42 students. Bowers-Whitley, part of a sprawling college area property that includes Muller Elementary School, is at 11% capacity with […]]]>

The Hillsborough County School District will overhaul its network of career centers, starting with the severely underutilized DW Waters and Bowers-Whitley schools.

Waters, off Columbus Drive in West Tampa, is operating at 9% capacity with 42 students. Bowers-Whitley, part of a sprawling college area property that includes Muller Elementary School, is at 11% capacity with 51 students.

No more, Superintendent Addison Davis said Wednesday at a press conference at the Bowers-Whitley field. Using funds from the federal Build Back Better Act and the state’s Workforce Development Program, he said he would convert Waters into a medical academy and Bowers-Whitley into a trades academy. construction.

“We’ll take this to the finish line,” Davis said.

No cost estimate was given, beyond an initial amount of $247,000 that will come from existing capital funds. District leaders are now determining course and equipment needs in conjunction with industry leaders and preparing to apply for government funding.

“We plan to expand and grow this as the need grows,” said Kim Bays, the school district‘s chief innovation officer. “It’s absolutely a work in progress.”

The goals of the Career Center expansion are twofold: to improve the earning potential of students who may not attend college immediately upon graduation and to provide labor to fuel the economy. Tampa’s fast growing.

Statewide private sector employment grew 6.4% last year, with thousands of new jobs in recreation and hospitality, construction, education and services health and manufacturing, according to district statistics.

The fastest growing occupations paying $52,000 and more include respiratory therapists, physical therapists, registered nurses and construction managers.

To attract more students to its career centers, the district is launching a marketing campaign centered around 40 promotional videos titled “Forty for the Future”. The videos, produced at the district’s communications office, will be broadcast in middle and high schools.

“Our responsibility is to create stackable credentials,” Davis said. He explained the term, saying students can prepare for careers while participating in dual-enrollment programs that also give them college credit. “There’s money to be made in the workforce now,” he said.

The redesigned Waters and Bowers-Whitley schools will open in the fall of 2023. Brewster Technical College, located near Waters, will reopen in 2024 as a medical technical college, designed to accommodate students who wish to continue after Waters.

Waters School now has students learning other trades, such as hairdressing, plumbing and cosmetology. These students will be helped to find other places where they can complete their studies while the school is closed for renovations.

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At Bowers-Whitley, students in automotive and construction industry programs will remain during the renovation, but no new students will be admitted until 2023.

In the long term, the district is also exploring options for a distribution and logistics center closer to the Interstate-4 corridor.

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ESFA Update local authorities: March 2, 2022 https://the-education-store.com/esfa-update-local-authorities-march-2-2022/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 14:45:20 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/esfa-update-local-authorities-march-2-2022/ 1. Action: coronavirus (COVID-19) no recourse to public funds – free school meals request form for additional pupil bonus The coronavirus (COVID-19) no recourse to public funds: the application form for the additional bonus for free school meals is now online. The deadline to submit your application is April 1, 2022 at 11:59 p.m. We […]]]>

1. Action: coronavirus (COVID-19) no recourse to public funds – free school meals request form for additional pupil bonus

The coronavirus (COVID-19) no recourse to public funds: the application form for the additional bonus for free school meals is now online.

The deadline to submit your application is April 1, 2022 at 11:59 p.m.

We have published tips to help you complete the complaint form.

You can read more advice for schools and local authorities on school meal arrangements during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

2. Reminder: Action Required by 5 p.m. Thursday, March 3 for School Reconstruction Program Nominations

If you would like a school to be considered for the program, you must register and submit applications through the online portal by 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 3, 2022. You will not be able to nominate schools without additional professional proof after this time.

For those who have chosen to provide additional professional evidence, you must designate your blocks and indicate that you wish to provide additional evidence by 5 p.m. on Thursday, March 3, 2022. The portal will remain open until Thursday, March 31, 2022 to submit evidence supporting.

Guidance on how to nominate a school for review is available on GOV.UK.

Please ensure that all necessary steps have been completed before the deadline to ensure your application(s) are considered. If you need help, please email school.rebuilding@education.gov.uk.

3. Information: consult my financial information (VMFI) updated with the latest CFR data

We updated the View My Financial Insights (VMFI) tool for local authorities and kept schools up to date with the latest consistent financial reporting (CFR) data.

You can log in to VMFI now to view the latest data and updated metrics.

VMFI can provide users with improved analyzes of their school’s financial situation and performance and an assessment of potential areas for improving the management of school resources.

You can read more information in the VMFI user guides.

4. Information: Extension of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) workforce fund until Easter to support the costs of staff absences in schools and colleges

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Workforce Fund has now been extended, providing financial support to eligible schools and colleges for costs incurred due to staff absences from Monday November 22, 2021 to Friday April 8, 2022 .

The fund is available to help schools and colleges facing significant staffing and funding pressures continue to deliver high-quality face-to-face education to all students.

More information on the COVID-19 workforce fund can be found in our guidance for schools and colleges.

The claims window will open in the spring.

5. Information: The Impact of School Resource Management Advisors

We have published an article on the impact of working with School Resource Management Advisors (SRMA) as well as a case study detailing how two schools in Hackney are expected to save £1.5m over 3 years as a result of their work with an SRMA.

The SRMA offer is free and open to any school, community or trust likely to benefit from this support, regardless of its financial situation.

6. Information: 16 to 19 Tuition Fund Allocations for the 2022 to 2023 Academic Year

We have not reported amounts for the tuition fund in 16 to 19 funding allocation statements for the 2022 to 2023 academic year, as this is part of a separate process.

The tuition fund for 16 to 19 year olds will continue through the 2023 to 2024 academic year, as confirmed in June 2021. The fund will continue to provide targeted tuition in small groups in English, math and other subjects where learning has been paused due to the pandemic and is available. to every 16 to 19 vendors.

We expect to release forecasts for the fund in March and confirm allocations in May.

If you have any further questions, please use our contact form.

7. Information: Implementation of IFRS 16 on leases – impact on school leasing activities

Below is the Department of Education’s approach to the impact of IFRS 16 on school leasing activities. Implementation for LA-operated schools will be subject to the outcome of CIPFA’s consultation on the postponement of IFRS 16 implementation which ends at 11:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 3, 2022.

Currently, maintained schools and academies are generally free to enter into operating leases, while finance leases require the approval of the Secretary of State under the Education (Maintained Schools) Act 2002 ) and the Academies (Academies) Funding Agreement and Trust Manual. The implementation of IFRS 16 will end the distinction between operating leases and finance leases and, in effect, all leases will be classified as finance leases.

In response, the DfE has worked with the sector to develop a new approach as we want to continue to allow maintained schools and academies to use leases to support their operation without additional administrative burdens.

The new approach is to provide the Secretary of State’s consent for particular classes of leased assets (listed below). Leases for items on this list will therefore not need to be submitted to the Ministry for approval:

  • all existing leases already in place on April 1, 2022 (maintained schools) and September 1, 2022 (academies)
  • IT equipment
  • telephony
  • Catering equipment
  • furniture
  • bathroom/sanitary equipment
  • gym equipment
  • grounds maintenance equipment
  • minibuses and other vehicles for school use
  • temporary classrooms and equivalent structures

The list will be reviewed after implementation and relevant guidance and documents are updated accordingly. Leases not included in the above list will need to be submitted for consent. We believe these will largely be land and building leases, and guidance can be found on GOV.UK.

If you have any questions, please email IFRS16.ENQUIRIES@education.gov.uk.

8. Information: purchase aid for schools

The new DfE Schools Procurement Support Service now enables all publicly funded schools and trusts to access free advice and guidance on purchasing goods and services through the DfE approved frames. Schools can click on the ‘Ask for advice and guidance’ link at the bottom of each of the Find an Executive web pages to contact our sourcing team.

From the summer, schools will also be able to get additional advice on purchasing, ongoing support to help them manage a procurement process on their own, or if a school or trust needs support additionally, the service can undertake the purchasing process on its behalf. The service aims to help schools get the best value for their non-staff expenses.

For the latest on our wide range of webinars, check out the events tab on our LinkedIn Buy for Schools page.

9. Information: Join Schools Technology Day on March 17, 2022

This is your chance to join the DfE Schools Commercial Team Technology Day 2022.

The Schools Commercial team has a range of DfE approved frameworks to help schools meet their purchasing needs. This is your chance to participate in a series of webinars that will show how we can help you save money on ICT – from telecommunications to printers, from scanners to interactive whiteboards, from networks to laptops.

Remember to book a separate ticket for each individual webinar you wish to attend.

For the latest news on our wide range of webinars, check out the events tab on our page (https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/buying-for-schools/events/).

ten. Information: Join these Approved Frameworks webinars and learn how you could save money for your school

The Department of Education (DfE) is running webinars on how using our approved frameworks could help your school get value for money.

If you are responsible for purchasing goods and services for your schools, check out the range of informative webinars that could help you save time and money.

All sessions are free, use these Eventbrite links to join the schools sales team and take the opportunity to ask providers any questions you may have about facility management, including catering, gas and water purchasing. electricity and cybersecurity.

For the latest news on our wide range of webinars, check out the events tab on our page (https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/buying-for-schools/events/).

11. Information: RPA Members – Webinar on Long-Term Health Risks

As part of our risk management support, DfE, in conjunction with Willis Towers Watson, is hosting a webinar on long-term health risks.

This workshop will cover:

  • those dangers in schools that can lead to long-term health effects
  • the Regulations applicable to hazards having long-term health effects

Please select the best date to read more information and register:

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Staffing crisis threatens home and community care sector with 421% increase in RN vacancies and 331% increase in PSW vacancies https://the-education-store.com/staffing-crisis-threatens-home-and-community-care-sector-with-421-increase-in-rn-vacancies-and-331-increase-in-psw-vacancies/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/staffing-crisis-threatens-home-and-community-care-sector-with-421-increase-in-rn-vacancies-and-331-increase-in-psw-vacancies/ A new survey from the Ontario Community Support Association shows vacancies for front-line staff in the sector nearly tripled from 2020 to 2021 TORONTO, February 10, 2022 /CNW/ – The Ontario Community Support Association (OCSA) is sounding the alarm on the state of its sector with the results of the latest vacancy rate survey*. OCSA […]]]>

A new survey from the Ontario Community Support Association shows vacancies for front-line staff in the sector nearly tripled from 2020 to 2021

TORONTO, February 10, 2022 /CNW/ – The Ontario Community Support Association (OCSA) is sounding the alarm on the state of its sector with the results of the latest vacancy rate survey*.

OCSA logo (CNW Group/Ontario Community Support Association)

According to recent OCSA Member Survey results for 2021, in their top three frontline positions (PSW, RN, RPN) for full-time and part-time employment, 17.4% of positions are vacant . This is almost triple the results of last year’s survey, which showed a vacancy rate of 6.8%. Additionally, 26.1% of all RN positions are vacant, an increase of 421%, while 14.2% of full-time PSW positions are currently vacant – an increase of 331% of full-time PSW positions vacant in the sector.

OCSA is a member organization representing over 220 agencies across Ontario who together support more than one million Ontarians in home and community care services. The sector cares for a variety of clients of all ages across the province, with a range of care needs, including vulnerable clients on dialysis and home ventilators. Services include nursing, personal care, rehabilitation, adult day programs, supportive housing/assisted living programs, meals on wheels, transportation, transitional care and more.

“Our member organizations such as VON and March of Dimes can no longer sustain current service levels without adequate resources,” says OCSA’s CEO. Deborah Simon. “These are non-profit organizations that depend on government support and fundraising. Many have long waiting lists and no staff to serve customers. The shortage has led to longer waiting lists, client triage, and the current trajectory will result in the cancellation of programs or services and with it, an increased burden on caregivers as well as additional pressures on long-term care (LTC) and hospitals across Ontario.”

Staff are leaving the home and community care sector in droves, many to other sectors where there are incentive opportunities to strengthen similar roles in hospitals and LTC. This means that PSWs in the home and community care sector have the same education, but earn on average 19% less than PSWs in the hospital sector and 9% less than PSWs working in long-term care. Registered nurses in home and community care also earn significantly less despite having the same education – an average of $11.00 less per hour, 32% less than in hospitals.

OCSA is calling on the government to urgently address this issue by:

  • Repeal Bill 124 – Home and community health care service providers cannot compete with LTC/hospitals who are able to pay higher wages for the same staff roles

  • Making the pandemic pay off permanently

  • Acknowledge the massive pay equity problem

  • Set up an urgent sector task force to address these HRH issues and report back to government with a system-wide plan

“We’ve seen this crisis quietly build as one arm of the system receives funding while the other, which is designed to keep people safe at home and ease the burden, is in dire straits. .There is no more lead, “says Simon. “We are ringing the alarm bell before it is too late.”

About OCSA

Celebrating its 30th anniversary, the Ontario Community Support Association (OCSA) represents nearly 220 not-for-profit organizations that provide home care and community support services to more than one million Ontarians. Our members help older people and people with disabilities to live independently in their own homes and communities for as long as possible. These proactive and cost-effective services improve quality of life and prevent unnecessary hospitalizations, emergency room visits and premature institutionalization. They are the key to a sustainable healthcare system for Ontario. For more information, visit www.ocsa.on.ca or @OCSATweets.

About the survey *
OCSA conducted two surveys, one in February 2021 and one in February 2022. Both surveys received more than 60 responses from OCSA members. The returned samples represented more than 11,000 frontline positions in both surveys. Both surveys asked members to identify the number of FT, PT and casual RN, IAP and PSW/care worker positions in their organizations and the number of people in these positions on the 31st of Decemberst2020, January 30st2021, the 31st of Decemberst2021 and January 30and2022. We used December 2020 and December 2021 data due to the completeness of the data. Some entries were missing January 2022 The data.

SOURCE Ontario Community Support Association

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Show original content to download multimedia: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/February2022/10/c3086.html

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Need to reintegrate children into the system: Abhijeet Banerjee https://the-education-store.com/need-to-reintegrate-children-into-the-system-abhijeet-banerjee/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 11:35:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/need-to-reintegrate-children-into-the-system-abhijeet-banerjee/ According to Nobel Laureate Abhijeet Banerjee, learning losses from school closures are one of the biggest global threats to long-term recovery from COVID-19 and the economic cost will be severe if remedial measures are not taken. are not taken urgently. Noting that temporary school closures will cause permanent damage, he said simply […]]]>

According to Nobel Laureate Abhijeet Banerjee, learning losses from school closures are one of the biggest global threats to long-term recovery from COVID-19 and the economic cost will be severe if remedial measures are not taken. are not taken urgently.

Noting that temporary school closures will cause permanent damage, he said simply reopening schools would not be enough and that failing to measure learning losses and take steps to reintegrate children into the system would be a “recipe for a disaster”.



The renowned economist is co-chair of the Global Education Evidence Advisory Group (GEEAP), which is working on recommendations for the education sector in the post-pandemic world. He won the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economics.

“The short- and long-term impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the education, well-being and future productivity of children is profound. Nearly two years after school closures began in most of countries around the world, governments must take urgent action to limit the Estimates suggest that the economic cost of lost learning from the crisis will run into the trillions of US dollars if corrective action is not taken urgently Banerjee told PTI in a phone interview from Massachusetts in the United States.

“While many other sectors rebounded as lockdowns eased, the damage to children’s education is likely to reduce children’s well-being and productivity for decades, causing disruption to education and learning losses due to school closures, one of the biggest threats to mid- to long-term recovery from COVID-19 unless governments act quickly,” he added.

Banerjee, who is currently a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), said schools should reopen at the earliest opportunity.

“Schools need to reopen and stay open as much as possible, but that will not be enough. It is very important to tackle the problem of dropouts to ensure that they return to school and have a plan to reintegrate children in the school system.

“Failing to measure learning loss and acting on the results will be an absolute recipe for disaster. We must recognize that children will definitely fall behind and urgent action must be taken to close the gap and minimize learning loss. income,” he said.

Launched in July 2020, GEEAP is an independent interdisciplinary body composed of leading education experts from around the world. Its mandate is to provide succinct, actionable, and policy-oriented recommendations to support decision-making by policy makers on investments in education in low- and middle-income countries.

“The third factor that countries urgently need to work on is teacher training. Teachers already had a difficult job and with learning losses, children falling behind and varying levels of learning in the classroom, it is harder for teachers to help most students catch up. Providing teachers with simple teaching guides combined with strong tracking and feedback systems can help them structure their teaching approach and ensure that children learn additional tutoring can also help children catch up,” Banerjee said.

“In addition to requiring urgent recovery efforts, the pandemic presents a rare opportunity to rethink and reset education provision so that children of all identities, socio-economic backgrounds and circumstances can learn and thrive,” he added.

Banerjee also warned against closing schools unless there is an aggressive variant of COVID-19 that puts children at extremely high risk.

“Even in the event of new outbreaks, schools should be the last institution to close and the first to reopen, given the relatively low risk of transmission and high cost to young people. If there is an aggressive variant of COVID-19 which puts children at extremely high risk, of course no one wants children to die. But if that’s not the case, I think we should avoid closing schools any further,” he said. .

Schools around the world closed in 2020 following the novel coronavirus outbreak and reopened in various countries depending on the Covid situation. At the height of the crisis, UNESCO data showed that more than 1.6 billion learners in more than 190 countries were out of school. More than 100 million teachers and school staff have been affected by the sudden closures of educational institutions.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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School sports tournaments remain suspended, Ministry of Education to revise guidelines next week https://the-education-store.com/school-sports-tournaments-remain-suspended-ministry-of-education-to-revise-guidelines-next-week/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 20:57:01 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/school-sports-tournaments-remain-suspended-ministry-of-education-to-revise-guidelines-next-week/ (UPDATE: Jan. 31 at 10:05 a.m.) – Although provincial guidelines changed on Tuesday to allow youth sports tournaments to resume, the Department of Education said school sports tournaments will remain suspended for the time being. “We recognize the importance of sports to students and school communities,” the ministry told NowMedia in an emailed statement. “Currently, […]]]>

(UPDATE: Jan. 31 at 10:05 a.m.) – Although provincial guidelines changed on Tuesday to allow youth sports tournaments to resume, the Department of Education said school sports tournaments will remain suspended for the time being.

“We recognize the importance of sports to students and school communities,” the ministry told NowMedia in an emailed statement.

“Currently, school districts are working to ensure that all students have access to in-person learning, which is crucial for children’s intellectual, social and emotional well-being.”

Although tournaments remain suspended, the ministry said student-athletes are still able to participate in games and individual competitions at this time.

Next week, the ministry will meet with the Provincial K-12 Steering Committee, made up of educators, parents, support workers, school leaders, counsellors, Indigenous rights holders and experts. in public health.

The Steering Committee will review current guidelines for school sports tournaments.

“We have worked closely with Public Health and BC School Sports to ensure that we can keep students and staff safe and healthy as we continue to navigate through the Omicron wave of the pandemic,” explained the Ministry.

“We are grateful for the extraordinary work undertaken at this time by everyone in our education system to ensure the continuity of student learning.”

On Friday, BC School Sports revealed the ministry’s decision to suspend school sports tournaments. The organization said it was “stunned by the decision”.

“There has been a commitment this year to ensure club and community access to sport remains equal to school sport,” a BCSS statement read.

“To have this decision made at such a critical time of year is disheartening to everyone involved in school sport and continues to threaten and erode the long-term health and sustainability of school sport.”

BCSS said it will not cancel any provincial events and will continue to schedule these tournaments, along with any variable contingencies that may be required.


(Original story: January 28 at 4:25 p.m.) – On Tuesday, provincial health officer Dr Bonnie Henry said the restriction on youth sports tournaments would be lifted from February 1.

“I know it’s an important time of year for many different sports, especially team sports, and we’ve been working with the organizers and with viaSport to make sure it can be done safely.” , she said during a live. Report.

While this seemed like exciting news for parents and children, it quickly became apparent that this might not mean that all youth sports tournaments would return.

BC School Sports (BCSS) took to social media shortly after Tuesday’s briefing to say that current preventive measures for K-12 require after-school sports tournaments to remain on hiatus.

“We have already had discussions with the Ministry of Education and hope to have more clarity on school sports tournaments by Friday,” BCSS wrote.

Friday came around and a decision was made, but it was not at all what BCSS, parents and young athletes were hoping for.

“We have been in contact several times this week to provide critical information on the importance of these events and the tight timelines due to upcoming zonal and provincial events,” a BCSS statement said.

“We communicated that having to adapt zone events would have a significant impact on direct financial costs for children and their families, costs for schools, the impact on missed school time or events that may not even happen. produce at all.”

BCSS added that it expressed concern about the immense cost student-athletes have already felt over the past 24 months, but that did not change the decision.

“Unfortunately, the Department of Education has made the decision to keep the K12 Guidelines Addendum in place without change, which means that all school sports tournaments are still prohibited,” the BCSS statement explained.

“We are amazed by this decision, as a commitment has been made this year to ensure that access to club and community sport remains equal to school sport, and that this decision is made at such a critical time in the year is disheartening for everyone involved in school sport and continues to threaten and erode the long-term health and sustainability of school sport.

The reasoning behind the decision is unclear and NowMedia did not receive a response to its request for comment from the department earlier this afternoon.

<who>Photo credit: archive photo</who>The Rutland Voodoos celebrate an upset win over the Kelowna Owls in the 2018 Okanagan Valley Senior Quad-A Men’s Basketball Tournament.” src=”https://www.kamloopsbcnow.com/files/files /images/voodoos.jpg” style=”margin: 5px;”/></p>
<p dir=According to BCSS, the department said the decision would be reviewed weekly, but gave no indication of when the K-12 guidelines might be changed to align with PHO orders.

“We will continue to strongly advocate for the return of school sports tournaments and share the frustration no doubt felt by student-athletes, coaches, parents and fans across the province,” the BCSS statement concluded.

“At this time, we are not canceling provincial events and continue to plan for these events, as well as variable contingencies that may be required. We will update membership as more information becomes available.

NowMedia will update this story if and when more information becomes available from the Department of Education.

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“Companies are more trustworthy than governments.” This is how the private sector is stepping up – The European Sting – Critical News & Insights on European Politics, Economy, Foreign Affairs, Business & Technology https://the-education-store.com/companies-are-more-trustworthy-than-governments-this-is-how-the-private-sector-is-stepping-up-the-european-sting-critical-news-insights-on-european-politics-economy-foreign-affairs-busine/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/companies-are-more-trustworthy-than-governments-this-is-how-the-private-sector-is-stepping-up-the-european-sting-critical-news-insights-on-european-politics-economy-foreign-affairs-bu (Credit: Unsplash) This article is brought to you thanks to the collaboration of The European Sting with the World Economic Forum. Author: Gayle Markovitz, Partnerships Editor, World Economic Forum The 2022 Edelman Trust Barometer reveals that companies and NGOs enjoy more trust than governments and that most workers expect CEOs to be the “face of […]]]>
(Credit: Unsplash)

This article is brought to you thanks to the collaboration of The European Sting with the World Economic Forum.

Author: Gayle Markovitz, Partnerships Editor, World Economic Forum


  • The 2022 Edelman Trust Barometer reveals that companies and NGOs enjoy more trust than governments and that most workers expect CEOs to be the “face of change”.
  • Heads of state, business leaders and world leaders gathered at the virtual Davos agenda this week to address the state of the world.
  • As governments rely on the private sector for credibility and partnership, how is the business world tackling the biggest issues facing the world in 2022?

Trust is a subject that has emerged in sessions through the Davos virtual agenda this week, as world leaders, business and civil society came together to address the state of the world.

No wonder businesses have a vital role to play. the Edelman Trust Barometer 2022 reveals that “My employer” is now the most trusted institution, at 77%, and workers expect CEOs to be the “face of change”.

As all eyes turn to business and governments look to the private sector for credibility and partnership, how is the Forum’s business community tackling the biggest issues facing the world? in 2022?

COVID-19, vaccines – a unified approach

First, the pandemic and how the world will recover from the global health crisis.

The global rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine was hailed this week at Davos Agenda 2022 as the “most successful public-private partnership in human history”. Two sessions on what’s next for COVID-19 and vaccine equity brought together the private healthcare and pharmaceutical industry with leaders to brainstorm next steps.

CEO of Moderna, Stéphane Bancel, explained how his company is collaborating to develop the vaccine to meet the needs of 2022 and Doctor Anthony Fauci called in turn for a unified approach to development and distribution COVID-19 vaccines and the fight against new variants as they emerge. https://www.youtube.com/embed/GbvXqU6GTDg?enablejsapi=1&wmode=transparent

Risks vs Reality

Infectious diseases ranked 6th this year Global Risks Report, which reveals what keeps risk analysts up at night and how companies need to plan for the short, medium and long term.

Global Risks Report 2022
Global Risks Report 2022 Image: World Economic Forum

In the report, Chief Risk Officer of Marsh McLennan, Carolina Klint, warned that the commercialization of space, with an increasing risk of collisions between satellites and space debris, threatens a “cascading effect” on critical services – such as telecommunications and transport.

And who could have not watched a Davos first – Live from space – where the astronaut Matthias Maurer, connecting via video link from the International Space Station, was joined by leading experts and industry leaders to explore how space research can improve life on our planet.

Meanwhile, on Earth, Group Chief Risk Officer, Zurich Insurance Group, Peter Giger explained, “Humans are no good at the boiling frog scenario, which is climate change; they are much better in the fight or flight scenario, which has been the pandemic. https://open.spotify.com/embed/episode/3OvEo5Vw4J5KhSoEvsePWw?utm_source=generator

Environmental risks dominated this year’s Risks report and were the subject of much discussion throughout the week. CEO of Vattenfall, Anna Borg, gave him a glimpse of the Meet the boss Podcast. She also discussed the energy transition alongside industry colleagues, including Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft, in a session focused on accelerate and scale up climate innovation. https://open.spotify.com/embed/episode/60umGs6L8jzwMxRDmLCoxB?utm_source=generator

Trading predictions – tech, tech, tech

Ahead of Davos Agenda Week, we asked business leaders for their views on key areas at risk – from net zero to supply chain disruption, and the future of care health to the power of data.

The main takeaways for the coming year are more innovation, more disruption, and radical change. And the answers all lie in technology. But the technology will require careful and ethical implementation to avoid the pitfalls of progress.

Digital transformation – but how to get there?

Digital adoption and equitable access to digital tools have been highlighted by the pandemic. During a session devoted to technological cooperation, representatives of the World Economic Forum Alliance Edison was in the spotlight, with the initiative impact change the lives of millions of people around the world. digital, COVID-19, EDISON Alliance

EDISON Alliance: What is the Forum doing to bridge the digital divide?

COVID-19 has exposed digital inequalities globally and exacerbated the digital divide. Most of the world lives in areas covered by a mobile broadband network, but more than a third (2.9 billion people) are still offline. Cost, not coverage, is the barrier to connectivity.

AT The Davos 2021 agenda, the World Economic Forum launched the Alliance EDISON, the first cross-industry alliance to accelerate digital inclusion and connect critical sectors of the economy.

Through the 1 Billion Lives Challenge, the EDISON Alliance aims to improve 1 billion lives worldwide through affordable and accessible digital solutions in healthcare, financial services and education by 2025.

Learn more about the work of the EDISON Alliance in our Impact story.

Edison Alliance Champion, Verizon’s Hans Vestberg emphasized that with 3.6 billion people still offline today, we must use 21st century infrastructure (mobility, broadband and cloud services) to achieve accessible and affordable digital technology and services for all . That’s why the Edison Alliance is working to improve digital inclusion for 1 billion people in health, education and financial services. https://www.youtube.com/embed/mV3eJKHLYLQ?enablejsapi=1&wmode=transparent

Doing well and doing well – stakeholder capitalism

The transition to a new type of capitalism – combining the creation of prosperity, service to society and respect for the planet – was discussed on new sustainable reporting indicators and one 5-Part Video Podcast Series. https://open.spotify.com/embed/episode/7pSj4vvmsn9jMqBz1S0Ww3?utm_source=generator

Julie Sweet, President and CEO, Accenture, spoke of a palpable shift in corporate mindset around reporting standards, highlighting how companies that have embraced sustainability are more profitable. https://www.youtube.com/embed/lHyLQuFQ5Z8?enablejsapi=1&wmode=transparent

Emphasizing the importance of “not just measuring, but actually doing” in efforts to address climate change, Alain Bejjani, Managing Director, Majid Al Futtaim, rush to act. Today, more than 140 companies showed their support for the Stakeholder Capitalism Metrics initiative, with more than 50 already include the metrics in their reports. https://www.youtube.com/embed/5n5NZUivz7A?enablejsapi=1&wmode=transparent

The idea of ​​stakeholder capitalism at the heart of an overhaul of reporting metrics has been the subject of Larry Fink, President and CEO of Blackrockit is appeal to CEOs be “deliberate about their role in society and act in the interests of their employees, customers, communities and their shareholders” in its annual letter to investors, announcing the launch of a new Center for Stakeholder Capitalism.

Business insights: CEOs and cyber threats

The year 2021 saw the highest average cost of a data breach in nearly two decades, and the business world is mobilizing. New Cybersecurity Learning Center, created by Selling power, Fortinet and the Global Cyber ​​Alliance, in partnership with the Forum, offers free training that is accessible worldwide through the Cybersecurity Learning Hub.

The week also saw the release of a number of key agenda items. reports, addressing cyber threats again, value chain resilience, quantum computing, net zero goals, nature in cities and more.

A Accenture Report on the “signals” that reshape organizations, highlights six ways to chart the future; PwC Annual Global CEO Survey suggests that business leaders worry most about cyber threats and health risks; and Deloitte Global Healthcare Outlook 2022 says innovation and disruption will continue in the sector.

More tokens, please

And finally, after Ursula von der Leyen’s rallying call for Europe to raise its game in semiconductor development and production, and the announcement of a new european crisps law, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger, was in the spotlight during a session on trade and supply chains.

He spoke directly on the issue, saying, “I think we in the industry have an obligation to our political partners.” And he talked about working to develop policies to “make technology a force for good”. https://www.youtube.com/embed/gObcJIUK8rA?enablejsapi=1&wmode=transparent

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The department should be commended for the efforts made to ensure that learning loss is minimized https://the-education-store.com/the-department-should-be-commended-for-the-efforts-made-to-ensure-that-learning-loss-is-minimized/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 06:01:24 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/the-department-should-be-commended-for-the-efforts-made-to-ensure-that-learning-loss-is-minimized/ Mr. Editor, There is no doubt that the COVID-19 pandemic has severely affected education, not only in Guyana but around the world. Studies have shown that after months of school closures, students have suffered significant learning losses. That being said, the Education Department‘s decision to reopen schools for face-to-face learning should be welcomed by parents […]]]>

Mr. Editor,

There is no doubt that the COVID-19 pandemic has severely affected education, not only in Guyana but around the world. Studies have shown that after months of school closures, students have suffered significant learning losses.

That being said, the Education Department‘s decision to reopen schools for face-to-face learning should be welcomed by parents keen to have a bright future for their children. The department is to be commended for its efforts over the past 17 months to ensure that learning loss is minimized.

While we are fully aware that there are health risks associated with returning to face-to-face learning, the long-term benefits are far greater.

Virtual learning has been beneficial over the past few months, but it has not been without challenges. Research has shown this has widened the gap for academic success as some students have been unable to attend classes virtually due to lack of resources such as internet or device access.

Returning to school with COVID-19 preventive measures in place would give children the opportunity to learn in a supportive environment.

We know that nothing can replace the value of a qualified teacher in front of the class. This will allow students to ask more questions and allow the teacher to dig deeper into a topic, resulting in a clearer presentation of the lesson.

However, attending school goes beyond academic development. Children learn not only through instruction, but also through interaction with their peers.

Being around children their own age is crucial for emotional and social development. This is where they learn to interact with other people and make friendships. This, as I said, will help their development as an individual.

I know parents are worried about not being able to supervise their children, but we cannot stay locked at home forever. I suggest parents talk to their children regularly to make sure they understand the importance of following COVID-19 protocols.

Yours faithfully,

Sean braithwaite

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